December 9 Event: “Modern China Studies and the Digital Humanities:” Photos and Audio

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Photographs and audio are now available from the December 9, 2014 event “Modern China Studies and the Digital Humanities: An Introduction to Computational Methods, Tools, and Data. ” The event, co-sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, featured Richard Jean So (PhD Columbia), an assistant professor of English at The University of Chicago.  His presentation was moderated by Eugenia Lean, associate professor of Chinese history and Director of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute

This event was the first installment in the series “Digital Humanities in the Study of East Asia.”

To listen to the event, please click here.

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December 3 Event: “The West: East Asian Historical Thought in Comparative Perspective:” Photos and Audio

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Photographs and audio are now available from the December 3, 2014 event “East Asian Historical Thought in Comparative Perspective: What History Is, Knows, Does: The West.” The event, co-sponsored by the Department of History, featured Eelco Runia, University of Groningen, Carol Gluck, George Sansom Professor of History at Columbia University, and Harry Harootunian, Senior Research Scholar at the Weatherhead East Asian Institute. 

Professors Gluck, Harootunian, and Runia participated in a two-hour panel discussion on the historiography of The West. Their conversation included a question and answer session with the audience and time for informal discussion over light refreshments.

This event was the final installment in a three-part series that explored the historical study of Japan, China, and The West in a comparative perspective.

To listen to the panel discussion on The West, please click here.

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November 18 Event: “China: East Asian Historical Thought in Comparative Perspective:” Photos and Audio

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Photographs and audio are now available from the November 18, 2014 event “East Asian Historical Thought in Comparative Perspective: What History Is, Knows, Does: China.” The event, co-sponsored by the Department of History, featured Viren Murthy, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Carol Gluck, George Sansom Professor of History at Columbia University, and Harry Harootunian, Senior Research Scholar at the Weatherhead East Asian Institute. 

Professors Gluck, Harootunian, and Murthy participated in a two-hour panel discussion on the historiography of China. Their conversation included a question and answer session with the standing room only audience and time for informal discussion over light refreshments.

This event was the second in a three-part series that explores the historical study of Japan, China, and the West in a comparative perspective. The final lecture, on the West, is Tuesday, December 3 at 6 p.m. The talk features Eelco Runia of the University of Groningen.

To listen to the panel discussion on China, please click here.

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November 5 Event: “Southeast Asia and the United States:” Photos

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Photographs are now available from the November 5, 2014 event “Southeast Asia and the United States.”  The event featured His Excellency Ashok Kumar Mirpuri, Ambassador of the Republic of Singapore to the U.S.  His talk was moderated by Duncan McCargo, Senior Research Affiliate, Weatherhead East Asian Institute; Professor of Political Science, University of Leeds.  The event was co-sponsored by the Southeast Asian Student Initiative (SEASI).

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October 9 Event “The New Kings of Crude: China, Oil, and Civil War in Sudan and South Sudan:” Photos

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Photographs are now available from the October 9, 2014 event “The New Kings of Crude: China, Oil, and Civil War in Sudan and South Sudan.”  The event featured Luke Patey, Senior Researcher at the Danish Institute for International Studies and the author of book The New Kings of Crude: China, India, and the Global Struggle for Oil in Sudan and South Sudan. His talk was moderated by Elizabeth Wishnick, Senior Research Scholar, Weatherhead East Asian Institute, and Associate Professor of Political Science and Law at Montclair State University.  The event was co-sponsored by the Institute of African Studies and the Asia Pacific Affairs Council.

During his talk, Luke Patey detailed China’s regional developments by telling the story of three individuals who were affiliated with the China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) and their roles in shaping the future of Sudanese oil. Patey began with the rise of Zhou Yongkang and how he, a former Politburo Standing Committee member, pushed CNPC into Sudan. Patey then told the story of Su Yongdi, who was the impetus behind CNPC’s oil drilling success in Sudan. Lastly, following years of positive oil output from Sudan, Patey talked about how the local instability led to the kidnapping and death of nine Chinese oilmen, including the death of 20-something year old Cui Leilei.

Through the accounts of these individuals, Patey summarized the CNPC involvement in Sudan that began as a successful oil venture and turned into a political and economic liability. In doing so, he concluded with several points about the topic: Sudan demonstrates that Chinese-African relations are a two-way street where Africa can act as a training ground for China to expand abroad. However, he noted, since Sudan is no longer lucrative, China is expected to withdraw and turn to more stable regions. Additionally, he explained that what happened in Sudan indicates that the government is struggling to adapt to its business counterparts. CNPC’s actions forced the Communist Party to increase its diplomatic presence and find ways to provide security for its citizens, actions that the government had not planned on doing initially; it indicates a limited ability to control events outside of China.

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October 8 N.T. Wang Distinguished Lecture “The Chinese Economy: Boom or Bust?” Photos and Audio

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Photographs and audio are now available from the October 8, 2014 Fifth Annual N.T. Wang Distinguished Lecture “The Chinese Economy: Boom or Bust?”  The event featured Lawrence J. Lau, Ralph and Claire Landau Professor of Economics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, and the Lulu Chow Wang Senior Visiting Scholar, Chazen Institute of International Business, Columbia UniversityCarl Riskin, Senior Research Scholar, Weatherhead East Asian Institute, and Distinguished Professor of Economics, Queens College, The City University of New York, moderated the event.  The event was co-sponsored by the Jerome A. Chazen Institute of International Business.

To listen to a recording of the lecture, please click here.

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October 20 Event “To Lose Without Fighting? The U.S., China, Southeast Asia and the South China Sea:” Photos and Audio

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Photographs and audio are now available from the October 20, 2014 event “To Lose Without Fighting? The U.S., China, Southeast Asia and the South China Sea.”  The event featured Bill Hayton, a BBC journalist and author of the book The South China Sea: The Struggle for Power in Asia, from Yale University Press.  The event was moderated by Kristy Kelly, Associate Research Scholar at the Weatherhead East Asian Institute.

Hayton’s talk, co-sponsored by the APEC Study Center, Southeast Asian Student Initiative (SEASI), and the Asian American Journalists Association at Columbia, illuminated the main ideas in his book, which is about how the United States may “lose without fighting” in Southeast Asia.

The phrase is a turn on Sun Tzu’s famous “to win without fighting,” and acts as a point of departure for discussing possible U.S. responses to Chinese “provocations” in the South China Sea. Hayton calls for caution in assuming that China takes deliberate action to fractionalize U.S. alliances in the region. Rather, he argues, Chinese motivations can be understood in other ways, such as through historical context and national self-interest.

To listen to a recording of the lecture, please click here.

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